Almost_a_Song-w

JOANA SÁ & LUIS JOSÉ MARTINS // Almost a Song

€8.90


 

Joana Sá. piano, toy piano, celesta, percussions & electronics
Luís José Martins. classical guitar, percussions & electronics

1. Cantiga de Amor
2. Rock em Setembro
3. Cantiga, partindo-se
4. Die wahnsinnige Forelle
5. presque Sarabande – quasi una fantasia

 


Listen


Product Description

Nearly. Nearly a song, somewhat familiar. Nearly comfortable, almost  fulfilling. The melody stays ever-open, indefinite, and then the song departs, breaks, never arrives. It’s not surrender, it’s a game, open to the listener. The avant-garde replaced musical statements with this new desire to offer something to the ear: the sustained notes of the “Sarabanda” never lodging in the periphery of memory, the dissolving of pitch into percussion, the repetition of musical cells, the loops, the ever different superimposed patterns, the changing textures and the suspension of climax… but for how long? Almost a Song is still a duo. And not only between guitar and piano. This in spite of the electroacoustic ramifications and of the instruments being – without losing the acoustic strength of their gestures- sometimes nearly swallowed by their own sound.

Joana Sá and Luís José Martins formed a duo in 2000 dedicated to the interpretation of contemporary music. They have developed numerous projects together amongst which the collective POWERTRIO with harpist Eduardo Raón. Luís José Martins is a member of the group Deolinda and Joana Sá has developed mostly solo work, namely Through this Looking Glass.

Artistic pathways converging at this game of pleasure and freedom which is Almost a Song.

Guilherme Proença

Joana Sá

 

1 review for JOANA SÁ & LUIS JOSÉ MARTINS // Almost a Song

  1. :

    The album starts very quietly with Joana Sá’s piano opening sonic space by creating a repetitive phrase that remains open-ended like a great invitation for Martins to join first with muted arpeggios on his nylon string guitar, and despite the calm build-up, the emphasis shifts constantly, moving the sounds to the distance, then with some punctuated chords reaffirming their presence like the flux of a river, to become even completely quiet in the second part of the long first track, only for the odd-metered theme to re-emerge with increasing percussive power and even electronic drama. A strange opening song, drawing the listener from romanticism to sentiments of utter desolation. “Cantiga de Amor”, you bet.

    The intensity increases with the high speed second track, one that is somewhat reminiscent of Egberto Gismonti’s music, with powerplay on guitar and piano, inventive, virtuoso and disconcerting because of the dissonance and the drama and the madness. “Rock em Setembro”: no prisoners taken. Then the central piece “Cantiga, partindo-se” brings you in a totally different world, with chimelike piano playing creating an eery atmosphere, ominous and dark, even if the playing itself remains light of touch but then the sound becomes multilayered in symphonic mayhem, making the duo sound like an orchestra for a phenomenal finale.

    “Die Wahnsinnige Forelle” (the crazy trout), brings us very extended piano sounds clashing and merging with fast-paced guitar arpeggios, into strange chime, bells and other spielerei. breaking down in maddening dissonance and distant whistling.

    The album ends with “Sarabande”, a quiet piece with sparse notes coloring a vast expanse of silence, sometimes meditatively, sometimes more agitated, yet always intense.

    This album was on my “to review” list for 2013, and it was one of the many albums that I regretted not having reviewed earlier (trust me, there are more albums in that case). Don’t miss it.

    in: Free Jazz by Steff

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Die wundervolle, so geheimnisvoll wie abstrakte Musik, die Joana Sá auf ziemlich schwer zugänglichen Alben wie Through The Looking Glass, eine sehr freie Adaption Lewis Carrolls, mit Reverenzen an Robert Schumann und Literaten der Moderne, oder Almost A Song, mit dem Gitarristen Luís José Martins dem geneigten Zuhörer bescherte, findet auf dem aktuellen – Elogio Da Desordem – seinen, mit Sicherheit nur vorläufigen, Höhepunkt an mysteriöser Verzauberung. Die Adaption/Kombination/Einbettung diverser Texte des momentan wohl interessantesten literarischen Allrounders Lusitaniens Gonçalo M. Tavares – Rosinda Costa zitiert Fragmente aus animalescos, o senhor Swedenborg, investigações geométricas, um viagem à ´India – in die spröden Pianokompositionen üben eine unwiderstehliche Faszination aus. Sá erforscht das semi-präpariertes Klavier auf der Suche nach dem idealen Klang zwischen Lärm und Stille und konfrontiert/ergänzt das Instrument mit einer Sirenen/Glocken-Installation, Toy Piano, Harmonium, Tubes und Noise-Boxes. Auch die Texte sind nur ein Bestandteil des großen Ganzen und vollständig in die Komposition eingebettet, wie auch die Kategorisierungen wie Pianistin, Improvisatorin, Komponistin aufgehoben werden.

    in: Mikro Wellen.

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    A not quite love poem, an open-ended daydream, a spontaneous idea that flutters away and falls apart right at its moment of realization. This narrative guides us through this collaboration between Portuguese artists Sa and Martins. Most notably on our “Rock” song; frantically scurrying to grasp a fleeting notion, they dizzy themselves trying to find common ground and collapse in fits of desperation. Martins’ guitar really injects a distinctly Iberian flavor here and on the first track, where his hypnotic 5/4 loops and serene fingerpicked sweeps act as an anchor for Sa to dreamily toss and turn around the keys in this tragic and ephemeral love song. The reprise on “partindo-se” settles into a more contemplative light, pondering its desolation and finding solace in isolation until tremors creep up the spine and fear sets in. Here the cavernous echo reveals the electro-acoustic presence on the album as on track 4 (translates as The Insane Trout), where the electronics really stand out, warping the toy piano and percussive plonks into surrealist delusions; Martins’ fingersweeps are all that keep us from drifting into the ether. The final track goes almost catatonic, resting precariously on the outer edge of consciousness, trying to keep hold of its last traces of slipping sanity. The musical lucidity here may be abstract in form, but it couldn’t be more concrete in emotion. Beauty in melancholy, bliss blossoms torment.

    in: Revue & Corrigee by Pierre Durr

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    A not quite love poem, an open-ended daydream, a spontaneous idea that flutters away and falls apart right at its moment of realization. This narrative guides us through this collaboration between Portuguese artists Sa and Martins. Most notably on our “Rock” song; frantically scurrying to grasp a fleeting notion, they dizzy themselves trying to find common ground and collapse in fits of desperation. Martins’ guitar really injects a distinctly Iberian flavor here and on the first track, where his hypnotic 5/4 loops and serene fingerpicked sweeps act as an anchor for Sa to dreamily toss and turn around the keys in this tragic and ephemeral love song. The reprise on “partindo-se” settles into a more contemplative light, pondering its desolation and finding solace in isolation until tremors creep up the spine and fear sets in. Here the cavernous echo reveals the electro-acoustic presence on the album as on track 4 (translates as The Insane Trout), where the electronics really stand out, warping the toy piano and percussive plonks into surrealist delusions; Martins’ fingersweeps are all that keep us from drifting into the ether. The final track goes almost catatonic, resting precariously on the outer edge of consciousness, trying to keep hold of its last traces of slipping sanity. The musical lucidity here may be abstract in form, but it couldn’t be more concrete in emotion. Beauty in melancholy, bliss blossoms torment.

    in: Kfjc by Abacus

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    “Almost a Song” é uma colaboração entre a pianista Joana Sá e o guitarrista Luís José Martins. Embora ambos já tivessem trabalhado juntos com Eduardo Raon no Powertrio, este duo não é “apenas” essa formação sem o harpista.
    As coordenadas são outras. O álbum apresenta composições dos dois músicos cuidadosamente trabalhadas e enlaçadas, numa forma menos livre e solta que a do trio e com menos recurso a técnicas extensivas, ou pelo menos com uma abordagem estilística e uma atitude que o distingue.
    O resultado é mais contemplativo e de rendilhado complexo, sendo ambos os músicos incrivelmente eficientes em desenvolver e segurar as ideias. Cada mudança sente-se como uma porta que se abre, permitindo a passagem de inesperadas brisas. Há mesmo algo de efabulatório, de fantástico, como um conto de fadas sem palavras.

    in: Jazz.pt by P.Sousa

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Surimpression de climats empruntant à la musique classique ou contemporaine, à la chanson, au free-jazz et au rock sur suites d’accords anodins se déconstruisant progressivement. Miniatures brutes, naïves, à observer à la loupe et rejoignant par moments l’esprit de KLIMPEREI ou de PASCAL COMELADE.

    in: Orkhestra

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    o CD da Sá e do Martins. Estes tocam uma série de instrumentos mas com prominência para o piano e guitarra clássica, e se esperam daqui a calmaria típica dos portugueses ou Indie Rock dos Pinhead Society (Sá fez parte) ou algum terror Deolinda (Martins faz parte), esqueçam. As peças invocam música de câmara cheia de silêncios e reflexão só que… de repente entra em drones barulhentos que estragam o ramalhete estético todo – e ainda bem! Um mimo este disco, um mimo!

    in: Chili com Carne by Marcos Farrajota

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Almost a Song, na sua interacção constante entre o leve dedilhar na guitarra de Luís José Martins e o piano fragmentado de Joana Sá, traz-nos uma colecção de peças assombrosas, tão inquietantes quanto reconfortantes na forma como se apresentam perante nós. Logo em “Cantiga de Amor” e “Rock em Setembro” atravessamos este turbilhão de sentimentos de melancolia e resignação até aos sprints endiabrados dos seus segundos finais, onde a distorção e o martelar diabólico nos deixam ofegantes. Apesar de menos turbulenta, “Cantiga, Partindo-se” ludibria-nos com uma aparente ternura, que revela tons ameaçadores no seus crescendos finais, “Die Wahnsinnige Forelle” — que significa ‘A Truta Insana’ (obrigado, Babelfish) — faz jus ao seu nome com a mescla de ruídos que nos apresenta e “Presque Sarabande Quasi Una Fan” (esta não fui traduzir) encerra o disco num ponto mais suave e ameno, mas nunca destoando da premissa estabelecida pelas anteriores canções.

    Ao longo dos seus cerca de 40 minutos, na sua agitação, suavidade, e de acordo com a estética quase minimalista a que muitas vezes recorre, Almost a Song não será, certamente, um disco para toda a gente. Mas para quem optar por se deixar conduzir ao longo das suas cinco canções, espera-lhe uma experiência deveras gratificante.

    in: Vice by João Rocha Pereira

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    L’initiative est encore osée de la part de Shhpuma, car ce duo sort vraiment des sentiers battus. La musique composée et improvisée par Joana Sá (piano, piano toy, celesta, percussions & electronique) et Luís José Martins (guitare classique, percussions & électronique) est plutôt protéiforme. En effet, les cinq pistes de ce disque sont le fruit d’un mélange un peu extravagant de méthodes d’écriture et de techniques de jeu propres au classique, à la chanson, au jazz, au rock, à la musique contemporaine, au free jazz. Des boucles mélodiques naïves et enfantines précèdent des clusters, une grille d’accord se déconstruit progressivement de manière atonale, etc. Mais je ne sais pas, je n’y arrive pas. Il y a une sorte de facilité ou d’inconsistance qui m’empêche de pénétrer chaque pièce, le plus rebutant étant l’ambiance naïve et crédule souvent présente. Et ce malgré quelques moments innovants et originaux ainsi qu’une technique instrumentale irréprochable… Presque une chanson, un peu trop proche pour moi de la chanson justement, avec ses ritournelles assommantes, ses mélodies niaises et ses structures inconsistantes.

    in: Improv Sphere by Julien Heraud

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    É Só Inquietação

    Quando Joana Sá e Luís José Martins, ela que fora dos Pinhead Society, ele que toca nos Deolinda, chamam ao seu duo e a este disco Almost a Song, a única pista que nos estão verdadeiramente a fornecer é a de que a improvisação que aqui se faz ouvir é derramada sobre estruturas que, apesar de elásticas, são ainda assim estruturas reconhecíveis. A partir desse entendimento, a palavra “song” pode voltar descansada para o sítio de onde veio. Nos seus cinco temas, diferentes abordagens a uma circularidade obsessiva e sempre na procura de um ponto de tensão quase insuportável (sobretudo Rock em Setembro e os minutos finais de Cantiga, partindo-se), o piano de Joana Sá e a guitarra de Luís Martins vão atraindo minudências electrónicas, como casas e telhados a voar sugados para o olho do furacão. Mais longe do que haviam ido com o Powertrio (que incluía o harpista Eduardo Raon) na sua proposta de música contemporânea, há neste duo uma capacidade avassaladora de torcer uma melodia e espremê-la até à última gota, até que esta quase perca a forma. Nessa altura, jogam-na fora e atiram-se a outra. Cada vislumbre de sossego é aqui sistematicamente colocado em contagem decrescente para uma torrente de inquietação. No piano de Joana Sá, autora do excelente Through this Looking Glass e da música (Variações pindéricas sobre a insensatez) do filme Tabu, de Miguel Gomes, há uma soltura e uma ansiedade que se encontram também na obra do pianista alemão Alexander von Schlippenbach – para onde confluem a música improvisada, o jazz e a clássica –, mas a sombra espectral da guitarra (e da sua manipulação) de Luís Martins atira Almost a Song para uma qualquer zona fora do mapa. A fluidez e organicidade com que tudo isto desfila à nossa frente é, acredite-se, coisa de pasmar.

    No seu segundo ano de existência, a Shhpuma oferece à música portuguesa a primeira obra de assombro da sua actividade editorial. Nem que fosse só por este disco, já tinha valido a pena inventar um nome e um catálogo.

    4,5

    in: Ipsilon by Gonçalo Frota

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Almost A Song é um projecto de Joana Sá e de Luís José Martins, dois terços de Powertrio que, em 2005, formaram com o harpista Eduardo Raon. Com a saída de Raon para o estrangeiro, o projecto foi-se diluíndo e a carreira de Joana e Luís encontrou rumos paralelos: a pianista apostou forte na sua primeira obra – “Through This Looking Glass” é uma obra portentosa para piano preparado que nos agitou há dois anos -, e Luís é um dos elementos dos consagrados Deolinda. Agora, de novo, estão juntos num disco que finalmente oficializa alguns concertos que nos tinham deixado óptimas impressões e com vontade de ouvir muito mais. Almost A Song não nos dá variações pop, como se podia supor, mas sim o contrário: composições contemporâneas e arrojadas que piscam o olho a melodias e refrões sem paternidade. É o “almost” que nos conquista sem retorno, esse terreno formado pela volatilidade e indefinição, e que forma uma obra que parece estar sempre em diversão pelos cânones para os implodir de seguida: “Cantiga Partindo-se” – note-se o título – é um monumental tema de 15 minutos que evolui do silêncio até a uma arrepiante tempestade eléctrica. “Almost A Song” está cheio de ideias, muitas ideias, compatíveis e benignamente incompatíveis, frutos da imaginação e brilhatismo de quem sabe muito bem o que está a fazer. E o que este powerduo está a fazer é deixar o seu nome na história de 2013. Soberbo.

    in: Flur by Pedro Santos

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Quase canções, disco admirável

    De que falamos quando falamos de canções? Talvez dessa harmonia suspensa em que voz e instrumentos, melodias fluidas e suas interrupções, nos ensinam a imaginar um ordem alternativa para o mundo das sensações e dos sentidos. Faz sentido, por isso, que este álbum de Joana Sá e Luís José Martins se defina através de um gesto aproximativo: Almost a Song (ed.: Shhpuma). São, de facto, cinco quase-canções trabalhadas por ela, em piano e algumas derivações, e por ele, em guitarra clássica e algumas electrónicas. O resultado possui a nitidez de uma geometria capaz de inventar os seus próprios parâmetros, envolvendo o fascínio radical de uma experiência que, sem pretensão nem auto-indulgência, viaja entre a experimentação jazzística e as sonoridades perdidas da infância (ouça-se o revelador Rock em Setembro). Admiravelmente elegante, elegantemente inclassificável — por certo um dos grandes discos da produção portuguesa dos últimos largos anos; e não é quase… é mesmo.

    in: Sound + Vision by João Lopes

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Quase canções perfeitas que fogem às convenções

    A pianista Joana Sá e o guitarrista Luís José Martins (Deolinda) uniram-se no projeto Almost A Song, acabando de lançar o primeiro álbum pela Shhpuma Records. Quando há dois anos se estreou em nome próprio com Through this looking glass, um trabalho inspirado no universo de Alice no País das Maravilhas, a pianista Joana Sá já tinha revelado um talento inexcedível, invertendo convenções com o seu piano preparado, que não se prendia em gavetas estílisticas rígidas para fazer valer a sua criatividade. Agora em Almost A Song uniu o seu piano (e restantes “brinquedos”) à guitarra clássica de Luís José Martins (membro dos Deolinda), que também se aventura pelas paletas eletrónicas. O maravilhoso resultado desta parceria poderia resumir-se com o título da terceira faixa deste disco, Cantiga Partindo-se. Juntos trabalham em melodias quase perfeitas, que quase se transformam em cantigas, mas desviando-se sempre dessas formas padronizadas, literalmente partindo-as para dali nascer um outro mundo. É nesse quase, nessa imperfeição que está o ganho deste Almost A Song. Porque é quando se dá o caos que as ideias mais revigorantes e inventivas se revelam em todo o seu esplendor, desafiando as normas do que se pode definir como jazz, música contemporânea, erudita ou improvisada. Sentem-se aqui as heranças da escola minimalista, mas também é perceptível a extrema cumplicidade entre Joana Sá e Luís José Martins na liberdade e elegância com que abordam a música e os seus instrumentos. Será muito difícil este ano superar uma obra tão desafiante quanto este Almost A Song.

    Classificação: 5/5

    in: Diário de Noticias by João Moço

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Quase uma canção, mas um disco por inteiro.

    Existe primeiro a estranheza: a da capa, conforto infantil que nos baixa as defesas, que nos engana e nos esconde a música real que aqui se encontra, as letrinhas minúsculas indicando toy piano ou classical guitar, a própria ideia de cantiga; partimos à procura da pop e da familiaridade, somos assomados pela brusquidão, pela travagem, pelo susto, até. Depois, Almost A Song abre-se-nos por completo. Permanecendo infantil, brincadeira de meninos. Junção de sons como quem pinta por fora do traço.

    Joana Sá e Luís José Martins, bons enganadores que são, crianças que deverão ser – quanto mais não seja onde é suposto continuar a ser-se criança, no coração – uniram esforços em Almost A Song para nos dar uma música a espaços indefesa, a outros desafiante, indiferente nunca. Suavemente, a guitarra e o piano constroem uma pequena fantasia, uma “Cantiga de Amor” sem letra (não precisa), melancólica, exacta: perto do final desfaz-se completamente, entra a electricidade e um martelar – é a rejeição. Talvez do amor, se quisermos ler demasiado e deprimidamente, talvez da canção em si, que é isso que o título do álbum nos indica.

    “Rock Em Setembro” poderia ser a ideia que um rapazinho tem deste género musical: cacofonia simples entre piano e guitarra, repetitiva e esgrouviada, tentativamente arrasadora no final – um metafórico riff demolidor de corninhos no ar. “Cantiga, Partindo-se”, a peça mais longa aqui presente, regressa à ideia inicial – vai criando uma atmosfera delicada que depois se parte ao meio, dando lugar ao medo e à sombra, terminando de forma abrupta. Um ligeiro ponto negativo apenas para “Die Wahnsinnige Forelle”, pequena confusão electrónica, à qual se sucede o silêncio quase absoluto de “Presque Sarabande”, pontuado por um leve dedilhar e chiares fantasmagóricos. Almost A Song, repetimos, engana: apresenta-nos quase-canções, mas é um (belíssimo) disco por inteiro.

    in: Bodyspace by Paulo Cecílio

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Dois tipos para fazer dos nervos música, só dois, mas com um crise de ansiedade que é obra e faz obra, tanta que por diferentes segundos estamos perto de ouvir a tal canção de que se fala e, graças a tudo o que pela ideia desta gente passou, tal facilidade não acontece, ou então fácil fácil, para estes anti-heróis, é fugir sempre que for possível. Esta é uma amostra, Almost a Song (um dos novos lançamentos da Shhpuma) faz-se de cinco momentos como este, na dúvida que gera criação, e completamente diferentes em tudo o resto. Improviso de quem sabe o que é compor e arriscar. Faz barulho:

    in: Independanças by Tiago Pereira

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    A not quite love poem, an open-ended daydream, a spontaneous idea that flutters away and falls apart right at its moment of realization. This narrative guides us through this collaboration between Portuguese artists Sa and Martins. Most notably on our “Rock” song; frantically scurrying to grasp a fleeting notion, they dizzy themselves trying to find common ground and collapse in fits of desperation. Martins’ guitar really injects a distinctly Iberian flavor here and on the first track, where his hypnotic 5/4 loops and serene fingerpicked sweeps act as an anchor for Sa to dreamily toss and turn around the keys in this tragic and ephemeral love song. The reprise on “partindo-se” settles into a more contemplative light, pondering its desolation and finding solace in isolation until tremors creep up the spine and fear sets in. Here the cavernous echo reveals the electro-acoustic presence on the album as on track 4 (translates as The Insane Trout), where the electronics really stand out, warping the toy piano and percussive plonks into surrealist delusions; Martins’ fingersweeps are all that keep us from drifting into the ether. The final track goes almost catatonic, resting precariously on the outer edge of consciousness, trying to keep hold of its last traces of slipping sanity. The musical lucidity here may be abstract in form, but it couldn’t be more concrete in emotion. Beauty in melancholy, bliss blossoms torment.

    in: KFJC by Albacus

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.