shh-05-ns

Out of stock

ALBATRE // A Descent into Maelstrom

€8.90


 

Hugo Costa: alto saxophone & loops
Gonzo Almeida: bass & electronics
Philipp Ernsting: drums & electronics

1. Nautilus
2. Maelström
3. Aphotic zone
4. Deep Trench
5. Vampyroteuthis infernalis
6. Albatrossia

 


listen


Product Description

Based in Rotterdam, and joining two Portuguese living in that city, Hugo Costa (alto sax) and Gonçalo Almeida (electric bass) to the German drummer Philipp Ernsting, the band Albatre plays a schizoid music which has free jazz and rock (as envisioned by punk and metal) as idiomatic poles. Everything immerged in distortion and with a sometimes heavy, sometimes crazily fast beat. But if the music is explosive and always searching for the maximum impact, very near of what is called noise – the noise of Fushitsusha, for instance –, there’s a place for nuance and for detail, with the three contributors throwing intriguing elements to the magma of sound.

This is another facet of both Costa’s and Almeida’s careers, in everything its mercuric character distinguishing itself from, for instance, the lunar surfaces created by the trio Lama, another recent investment of the bassist we find here. Once more we have the proof that the generation of Portuguese musicians migrated to other European countries is going far in terms of creativity, non-conformism and even innovation, in a time when all factors seem to determine a homogeneity of styles.

The future belongs to them and this CD can be understood as the definitive indication of what is to come. Get ready…

1 review for ALBATRE // A Descent into Maelstrom

  1. :

    “Wanted power and ingenuity , it remains a deadly combination , especially if you get musically translated into a cocktail of adrenaline and ecstasy . Immersive fever dreams flemen and charm to your wiping with a vicious slap in the face . Against the wall a minute later Within the noise rock and free jazz at the crackling violence you get them sometimes . Let that be just the zones between which the trio Albatre rolls with the muscles .

    Residing in Rotterdam Portuguese Hugo Costa ( alto sax ) and Gonçalo Almeida ( electric bass and better known of the Lama trio ) made an alliance with the German drummer Philipp Ernsting and debut album A Descent Into The Maelstrom appeared when mounted under the wings of Clean Feed Shhpuma label . That record makes a good half hour for a smart oscillation between impressive power and dazzling inventiveness .

    The first reference that thought, it is probably Zu , though it tends more towards the older records of the Italian trio , when the mobile free jazz madness still took the top jazz metal. That Costa plays a lighter sounding alto sax , is also of course for something in between . And for the rest , you can compare it to a whole series of bands in the area: more metal than The Thing or Cactus Truck, less chaos than The Flying Luttenbachers, Gustafsson some projects here and there with the straight – to – the – raapse swing of the Belgian .

    But there is a lot happening here . From opener ” Nautilus ” , which from menacing noise puts an epic soundscape on legs , it is already clear . Long saxlijnen provide an expansive mood ( as it all seems to be attractive ) , to an ever more astonished , almost emotionally distraught tenor from arising , whining in red , backed by thunderous basgeweld and a drummer you all the corners of the room shows , with ultimately a more straightforward catharsis in the final. Pretty punishment headphone feed.

    With ” Maelstrom ” and ” Aphotic Zone ” which is somewhat similar course pursued ; The first still from sputtering electronics and screeching excesses to a tough final with a monstrously heavy grinding bass , the second with a tumultuous start that turns into a subdued abstraction with jagged bass effects , a percussive shadow dancing and crying sax serenade , to get to the end again violently boiler noise of a Weasel Walter . Exciting, miljaar , so exciting .

    The other three tracks are shorter and tend to be easier to absorb . The staccato pumping ” Deep Trench ” searches the Amphetamine Reptile between noise rock and [ Sic ] , while the start / stop dynamics ” Vampyroteuthis Infernalis ” the madness of Painkiller to enter the field of Mannheim . Angular revolving turbo rock with a massive ripping sax on it . ” Albatrossia ” comes almost as an accessible valve with a rocking rhythm section , but also the last time , there is increasing colored outside the lines to arrive at screeching noise . Using jet-black tone sweep

    That makes everything from A Descent Into The Maelstrom a challenging and compelling record, which shows us that the genre we call convenience jazz core is still alive , though there is here a bit stronger stared into jazz and freak element than the more rock -oriented bands . Nevertheless, this is a band that fans of extreme crack work can only unite .”

    in: FreeJazz by Stef

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Today the new Clean Feed batch has arrived, and we’re still struggling to get some of the previous releases reviewed. This album comes from Shhhpuma, the Portuguese label’s side project, now featuring Albatre, a sax trio that brings us a refreshing and modern new sound.
    The trio is Hugo Costa on alto sax, Gonçalo Almeida on electric bass and German drummer Philipp Ernsting, but their take on jazz is anything but what you can expected. It sounds like the grunge version of jazz, with heavy moments of raw violence alternated with quieter melodic moments, like a mixture of Zu with Jim Black’s Alasnoaxis.
    Bass and drums come with all the anger and energy of a rock or punk band, while the alto screams and wails full of distress and agony like only a sax can in the best of free jazz modes. The music is raw, direct, without embellishments and needless decoration. This is straight-in-your-ears power jazz, but then of the clever kind and with depth.
    A Descent Into The Maelstrom … indeed!

    in: Enola be

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Today, another volume in the adventurous Shh Puma series of avant recordings overseen and manufactured by the makers of Clean Feed. It’s a good one. The trio at work on this program is Albatre. The disk is entitled A Descent into the Maelstrom (shh puma 005).
    Albatre is a rather explosive grouping of Hugo Costa on alto sax and loops, Goncalo Almeida on electric bass and effects, and Philipp Ernsting, drums and electronics.
    This is out, very edgy music with a pronounced electricity. It has the power of avant metal though it isn’t quite that. It is highly energized avant free jazz-rock on the fringes. Hugo Costa warbles, screeches and blasts his way through walls on the alto. Goncalo Almeida hits the bass full-force and gets the power of hard and furious playing with the judicious aid of effects. Sometimes he sounds very guitar-metal like, sometimes it is a bracing set of low-frequency barrages, but it’s good. And Phillip Ernsting hits the drums on all-fours, bashing, thrashing and weaving in and out of time. He also provides washes of electronics which add to the tumult.
    Now I know there are some that might not appreciate this music. But hey, some of what I cover is not for the unwary, and so this fits right in with those sorts of recordings. It does it excellently, flat-out, with no attempts at commercial amelioration whatsoever. A first-rate avant blow-out! Recommended if you dig the interface between free jazz and metal thrash. Yeah!

    in: Gapplegate by Grego Edwards

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Da Europa tem vindo intensas variações do que podemos chamar de jazzcore. O trio Albatre é uma das novas surpresas nessa seara, tendo em sua base dois instrumentistas portugueses – o baixista Gonçalo Almeida e o saxofonista Hugo Costa – aliados ao baterista alemão Philipp Ernsting. Embebidos por energia e urgência que desvelam influências tanto do free jazz quanto do rock, o trio montou sua base na cidade de Roterdã e tem aos poucos invadido palcos europeus referenciais do free – em maio, por exemplo, chegam ao clássico espaço londrino “Vortex Jazz Club”. Sem obrigatoriamente fazer do peso ruidoso uma busca incessante, o Albatre encontra espaços para divagações entorpecentes que preparam os tímpanos para os centrais picos explosivos. Uma das grandes revelações do ano.

    in: Free Form Jazz by Fabricio Vieira

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Albatre is an improvising trio from The Netherlands consisting of Hugo Costa on alto saxophone and electronics, Gonzo Almeida on bass and electronic effects and Philipp Ernsting on drums and electronics. Their music is frenetic and exciting free jazz with splashes of electronics that gives the music a wide palette of sound. Electric bass guitar and pulsating drums combine with snarls of electronics making a dark and ominous sound that is really in your face with blasts or drums between wails of saxophone. The start-stop dynamic they use is particularly effective as a tension building device on “Malestrom.” A spare and haunting theme opens “Aphotic Zone” with the reverberations of the electronics making for a lonely feel to the music. The full band comes through and really ramps things up into overdrive, moving into the following track, “Deep Trench” which is shorn of any ornamental nature and evolves into a pure trio stomp. “Vampyroteuthis Infernalis” has a strong bass and drum foundation that drives the music ever forward and makes for a great launching pad for an absolutely scalding sound. The closing “Albatrossia” breaks with the formula a bit, with Almeida and Ernsting developing a fractured funk groove before Costa enters and leads the group into an overpowering collective improvisation. I found this album to be quite enjoyable and exciting. The group holds nothing back, and fans of The Thing and similar groups should find a lot to enjoy here.

    in: Music and More by Tim Nil

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Ce sont deux portugais et un allemand qui forment le trio Albatre, trois musiciens prometteurs que j’entends ici pour la première fois: Hugo Costa (saxophone alto, loop), Gonçalo Almeida (basse électrique, effets) et Philipp Ernsting (batterie, électronique). Indéniablement, Albatre rappelle la fin des années 90 et le début des années 2000 avec ce mélange détonant de punk et de free jazz. Une musique puissante, énergique et explosive, avec un son global massif et enflammé, des riffs gras et nerveux, des blasts et des rythmiques progressives tendues, un saxophone criard et virulent. Oui, on reconnaît là les éléments qui faisaient de Zu un super trio, mais Albatre ne s’arrête pas là. Avec l’ajout d’effets et d’électronique, c’est tout un penchant de l’improvisation libre et de la noise qui s’ajoute à leur musique. Albatre sonne comme un hommage aux groupes de free-rock, mais enrichit aussi sa musique d’éléments plus propres à l’eai et à la noise, ainsi qu’au progressif par moments… Six pistes, une petite demi-heure, et le tour est joué pour une suite explosive et grandement énergique de morceaux variés, énervés, viscéraux, sincères et originaux.

    Une musique pour intellectuels “frustrés de n’avoir jamais été punk”, pour mélomanes alcoolisés et amateurs de noise comme de free. Hardcore, puissant, massif: jouissif.

    in: Improv Sphere by Julien Heraud

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Há gajos com sorte, ponto. Gajos como eu e outros mais que já tiveram a oportunidade e o privilégio de poder desfrutar deste “A Descent into the Maelström” (Shhpuma, 2013), novíssimo disco dos Albatre, um projecto sediado em Roterdão, na Holanda, e dinamizado por Hugo Costa (saxofone alto e loops), Gonçalo Almeida (baixo eléctrico e electrónicas) e Philipp Ernsting (bateria e electrónicas). E não é exagero, há mesmo gajos com sorte; mesmo.

    “A Descent into the Maelström” é um disco cheio de complexidades, um disco cheio de múltiplas soluções criativas. Não sendo um disco de puro rock ou de jazz, é acima de tudo um disco disso tudo e muito, muito mais. Estilisticamente pouco ortodoxo, ”A Descent into the Maelström” é ainda assim um enorme e criativo exercício de estilo, cravado de elementos rock e free jazz alinhados por fortes correntes de improviso e uma indomável vontade experimental. Não se espere o óbvio, nada disso, esperem antes uma conjunto de novas e intrincadas soluções instrumentais. O ritmo é verdadeiramente pulsional, assombroso, a espaços também vagaroso mas quase sempre violento, pujante, de linhas sonoras enigmáticas. Por mim, está encontrado um dos discos do ano!

    in: A Trompa by Rui Dinis

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Crítica rock a um disco de jazz. Ou o contrário.

    Grosso modo existe, tanto nas cabeças de quem escreve como de quem lê, a ideia (quase como um estereótipo, se é que lhe poderemos chamar assim) de que a crítica jazz tem obrigatoriamente de ser diferente da escrita pop/rock; os agentes culturais e outras forças externas incutem-nos essa percepção de que a primeira é mais erudita, e por conseguinte deverá ser analisada de forma mais cuidadosa, minuciosa, do que o simples disco rock de massas. Não enveredemos, contudo, por esse género de discussões – estas linhas são apenas um prefácio ou uma justificação para o que se segue.
    O facto é que projectos como os Albatre – que não são os primeiros nem serão os últimos a pegar na feeria rock e a misturá-la com improvisações ou incursões pelo jazz – obrigam-nos a pensar nisto: que recursos estilísticos poderemos nós, os que escrevem, empregar? Importa falar de A Descent Into The Maelström com a loquacidade e literacia que nos merece, estudando estas peças academicamente, ou, do alto da nossa juventude eterna e rebelde, exorcizar Lester Bangs e descrever/elogiar o disco de Hugo Costa (saxofone alto), Gonçalo Almeida (baixo eléctrico) e Philipp Ernsting (bateria) por aquilo que nos faz sentir, inserindo a caralhada certeira no final de um qualquer parágrafo?
    Dado que uma crítica é pessoal e intransmissível a não ser que estejamos a falar da Pitchfork e do seu rebanho hipster, opte-se pela segunda – pedindo desde já desculpa a quem se sentir ofendido ou enganado – porque 1) o autor destas linhas não é académico nem pretende sê-lo e 2) o autor destas linhas é um jovem eterno e rebelde do rock n’ roll. A Descent Into The Maelström é um híbrido excelente, uma daquelas provas de que o casamento interracial é algo de belo. Há um qualquer tema náutico na sua génese mas não interessa, porque temos que indubitavelmente falar da forma de tocar incendiária de H. Costa, e esta analogia seria um paradoxo absurdo ou um enorme erro de cálculo, já que o fogo não se dá bem com a água.
    O destaque, contudo, vai todo para o baixo (já que a crítica é pessoal assuma-se desde já um fetiche por este instrumento) e para o riff pesado que o próprio começa a esgalhar ali por volta dos três minutos de “Maelström”, cru e eléctrico, acompanhado por percussão enérgica – julgamos estar num moshpit até que o chiar do saxofone em “Aphotic Zone” nos traz de volta à realidade. Este é um disco de jazz, ou lançado por uma editora de jazz, por isso não podemos dizer que isto nos arrepia a espinha. Ou se calhar até podemos. Daqui até final A Descent… continua a corroer-nos as veias com mais da mesma brutalidade, passando pela carícia stoner de “Vampyroteuthis Infernalis” e finando em “Albatrossia”, esgotados todos os adjectivos doutos. Venham então os populares: isto é do caralho.

    in: Bodyspace by Paulo Cecílio

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Albatre provém da fornalha efervescente da cena improv da Holanda (Roterdão), de onde têm saído outros jovens grupos particularmente dinâmicos como EKE (com Yedo Gibson, Oscar Jan Hoogland e Gerri Jäger). Funciona como uma espécie de “power trio”, com os “loops” e o sax alto de Hugo Costa no lugar da guitarra eléctrica.
    Gonçalo Almeida troca, neste contexto, o seu habitual contrabaixo por um baixo eléctrico e Philipp Ernsting desdobra-se entre a bateria e a electrónica. A fazer jus ao portentoso conto de Edgar Allan Poe com o mesmo nome deste disco, “A Descent Into the Maelström”, a música espirala-se em contínuas camadas, ganhando as composições títulos tão pouco auspiciosos como “Apothic Zone” ou “Vampyroteuthis infernalis”.
    À primeira audição parece-nos um clone de Zu, mas com algo de Painkiller. O certo é que se afasta da complexidade técnica de Zu, que por vezes constrange a música deste grupo italiano, assim obtendo um “drive” único. E se não chega à insanidade de Painkiller, também, felizmente, não lhe repete o “azeite”.
    Apesar das boas ideias introduzidas, estas arrastem-se sem desenvolvimento nem conclusão. O conceito estético adequa-se perfeitamente ao conceito de Poe, fosse essa a intenção ou não, mas a fórmula necessita ainda de algum refinamento.

    in: Jazz.pt by P.Sousa

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

Out of stock